Tag Archives: behavioral health care

InSight Telepsychiatry Hosts Webinar on the Implications of the Recently Passed New Jersey Telemedicine Legislation

telehealth advocacy

InSight Telepsychiatry Hosts Webinar on the Implications of the Recently Passed New Jersey Telemedicine Legislation

Marlton, NJ – On December 5th, 2017 InSight Telepsychiatry hosted a webinar titled “What NJ’s Telemedicine Policy Means for Behavioral Health.” The webinar recording can be accessed here.

After viewing the webinar, participants will:

  • Understand what changes for behavioral health care with NJ’s new telehealth policy
  • Look at how new NJ telehealth policy changes how your organization provides care
  • Learn how to provide care in the context of the state’s new policies

The webinar was presented by Geoffrey Boyce, the Executive Director of InSight Telepsychiatry and an advocate for the appropriate use and value of telebehavioral health. Boyce discussed the new telehealth law and how it differs from previous regulation and also reviewed the key aspects of the bill and how they will affect the behavioral health industry and organizations that partner with behavioral health organizations.

Finally, Boyce looked at how the law can be used to expand access to psychiatry, mental and behavioral health care across the care continuum. Attendees will learn how they can use this bill to be active participants in changing the behavioral health industry.

“We’re enthused by the opportunities for improved access to care that this new law brings to the telemedicine industry and to New Jersey,” says Geoffrey Boyce, Executive Director of InSight Telepsychiatry. “We’re happy to share these updates with stakeholders in the field so they can be applied at their respective organizations.”

Over the summer, New Jersey passed the telehealth legislation making it one of the most innovative and supportive telemedicine states in the country. The state is already home to a handful of telemedicine programs, and the new law provides the opportunity for the continued expansion of telemedicine.

About InSight Telepsychiatry

InSight is the leading national telepsychiatry service provider organization with a mission to increase access to quality behavioral health care through telehealth. InSight’s behavioral health providers bring care into any setting on an on-demand or scheduled basis. InSight has 18+ years of telepsychiatry experience and is an industry thought-leader. More information can be found at www.InSightTelepsychiatry.com.

Stewart Memorial Community Hospital Launches Telepsychiatry Program

Lake City, IA – Stewart Memorial Community Hospital, a general medical and surgical hospital with 25 beds, launched a telepsychiatry program this week to increase access to psychiatric care. Located in Calhoun County, Lake City is a rural area with a shortage of mental health professionals, as designated by the Rural Health Clinics Program and the Federal Office of Rural Health.[1]

Telepsychiatry is the delivery of psychiatry through real time videoconferencing. It is proven to be an effective form of care delivery and a great way to expand the psychiatric support at a hospital, especially during difficult to staff hours like nights and weekends.

In a primarily rural state such as Iowa, patients often have limited or no access to timely, affordable and quality care. This is especially prevalent in regards to psychiatric care. With telepsychiatry, emergency departments can efficiently address each patient that comes in, reduce admissions and decrease patient wait times.  Having access to telepsychiatry can also help reduce psychiatric boarding and help make sure that those admitted to psychiatric beds actually need them. This is particularly useful in Iowa which, according to the Treatment Advocacy Center, ranks second worst in the country for number of inpatient psychiatric beds with just 64 in the entire state.[2]

The telepsychiatry program is launched in partnership with InSight, a national telepsychiatry service provider organization. Telepsychiatry services are provided in the emergency department to help ensure patients struggling with mental health issues are properly treated. This gives room for other patients that come into the emergency department that may have potentially life threatening illnesses.

“Partners like Stewart Memorial Community Hospital exemplify the great impact telepsychiatry can have at a community level. Telepsychiatry has been shown to increase access to mental health care in rural areas and we’re pleased to expand that within communities like Lake City,” said InSight’s Operations Director Dena Ferrell.

“Stewart Memorial is always looking to incorporate innovative new programs that help our patients achieve a healthy mind and body. Our partnership with InSight will help better address the behavioral health needs in our community,” said Cindy Carsten, CEO of Stewart Memorial.

Stewart Memorial is served by 13 InSight telepsychiatry providers. All InSight telepsychiatry providers are licensed in Iowa and trained to provide care to Stewart Memorial patients in the same way as all onsite providers. Stewart Memorial’s partnership with InSight will help transform care in the emergency department and increase efficiency so that all patients are able to receive the care they need.

About InSight Telepsychiatry
InSight is the leading national telepsychiatry service provider organization with a mission to increase access to quality behavioral health care through telehealth. InSight’s behavioral health providers bring care into any setting on an on-demand or scheduled basis. InSight has 18+ years of telepsychiatry experience and is an industry thought-leader. More information can be found at www.InSightTelepsychiatry.com.

About Stewart Memorial Community Hospital
Stewart Memorial is committed to quality health and wellness for you and your family. Our goal is to transform our communities by providing coordinated care and exceptional experiences.

[1] Rural Health. (n.d.). Retrieved August 07, 2017, from https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/am-i-rural/report?lat=42.26715&lng=-94.74603&addr=1301 W Main St%2C Lake City%2C IA 51449&exact=1

[2] Fuller, D. A., Sinclair, E., Geller, J., Quanbeck, C., & Snook, J. (n.d.). Going, Going, Gone TRENDS AND CONSEQUENCES OF ELIMINATING STATE PSYCHIATRIC BEDS, 2016. Retrieved August 8, 2017, from http://www.treatmentadvocacycenter.org/storage/documents/going-going-gone.pdf

 

Family Service Launches Outpatient Telepsychiatry Program

Philadelphia, PA – Family Service Association of Bucks County launched an outpatient telepsychiatry program to increase efficiency and access to psychiatric care for adults, children and adolescents across four of their locations in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The telepsychiatry program is launched in partnership with InSight, a national telepsychiatry service provider organization.

Telepsychiatry is the delivery of psychiatry through real time videoconferencing. It is proven to be an effective form of care delivery and a convenient, cost-effective way to safely expand the psychiatric support without the challenge of staffing an in-person psychiatry provider.family service

Prior to implementing a telepsychiatry program, Family Service staffed an onsite psychiatrist that would travel between Langhorne, Doylestown and Quakertown locations. With telepsychiatry, Family Service was able to increase efficiency and reduce costly, time consuming commutes.

“Telepsychiatry allows organizations like Family Service to reduce commute time for providers and patients. This allows for more valuable time with patients,” said InSight’s Operations Manager of Scheduled Services Nate Ortiz.

It is estimated that 1,051,490 individuals in Pennsylvania are living with serious psychological distress including major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, panic disorder or anxiety.[1] Telepsychiatry is a great solution in Pennsylvania and in many other states across the nation where there is a shortage of psychiatry providers.

“We are thrilled to be able to offer this innovative new service to our patients. We are dedicated to increasing psychiatric access to all consumers, and this is a smart way to ensure our patients are getting the care that they need on a consistent basis,” said Audrey J. Tucker, Chief Executive Officer.

InSight’s telepsychiatry provider will offer these services to patients in Family Service outpatient behavioral health programs, namely counseling.

About InSight Telepsychiatry

InSight is the leading national telepsychiatry service provider organization with a mission to increase access to quality behavioral health care through telehealth. InSight’s behavioral health providers bring care into any setting on an on-demand or scheduled basis. InSight has 18+ years of telepsychiatry experience and is an industry thought-leader. More information can be found at www.InSightTelepsychiatry.com.

About Family Service Association of Bucks County

Family Service Association of Bucks County is a nonprofit social service organization with locations throughout Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Family Service’s mission is to listen, care and help. Every day. For more than 60 years, Family Service has been improving the lives of children and their families, doing whatever it takes to help them overcome obstacles and reach their full potential. Visit www.fsabc.org to donate, volunteer or learn more about how Family Service helped more than 27,000 children, teens and adults last year.

[1] National Institutes of Mental Health, National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) 2015, and

NSDUH-MHSS 2008-2012.

Increasing Access to Mental Health Care with Telepsychiatry

Primary Care Doctor Referring to Telepsychiatry

By James Varrell, MD

The United States is facing a severe shortage of psychiatrists, in which 55 percent of counties nationwide currently have no psychiatrists available, according to a new report. This shortage is impacting the country’s health care system, particularly for primary-care doctors, who increasingly have to assume these roles to treat mental or behavioral health conditions.

Taking on mental health care often requires more time and resources to adequately assess and treat such conditions, which can further limit the valuable time doctors have with other patients at the point of care.

Moreover, the delivery of specialized mental healthcare can be out of the realm of expertise or comfort for many primary-care doctors. When it is, it makes sense to refer care to psychiatry providers. Yet, due to the current shortage of psychiatrists, patients may need to wait weeks—sometimes even months—to be seen by a local psychiatry provider in their community.

This is where direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry, also known as in-home telepsychiatry, can help fill the gap for primary-care doctors. Telepsychiatry is a type of telemedicine that uses videoconferencing to provide psychiatric evaluation, consultation and treatment.

Why direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry?

Telepsychiatry offers several benefits, and meets the standard of traditional in-person care. Telepsychiatry can meet patients where they are, whether at home or in a private office, eliminating time spent traveling to appointments or in waiting rooms. It also allows more flexibility with scheduling, as direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry providers usually work from home themselves and can offer appointments during non-traditional hours, including evenings and weekends.

By eliminating long wait times associated with community-based psychiatry options, direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry enables greater accessibility to psychiatry providers and supports continuity of care. It expands the reach outside the local community, so patients have access to high quality care and a variety of specialized providers. As long as a telepsychiatry provider is licensed in the state where a patient is physically located, they can deliver care. This also opens the door for patients to continue seeing their same psychiatry provider throughout many life transitions; including job changes, college, and vacations.

Just like with in-person treatment, patients meet with the same telepsychiatry provider over time, allowing the patient and his or her consented primary-care doctor to develop a rapport with the remote psychiatrist. By ensuring the mental health of a patient is appropriately addressed, primary-care doctors can better attend to the patient’s physical health.

Key considerations when referring patients

Referring patients to direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry is similar to referring to any outpatient setting. Like other referrals, the process begins with an intake of patient’s medical history and applicable screenings to determine if the patient requires specialty care.

Telepsychiatry is versatile and has been proven effective with all age groups. For patients who worry about mental or behavioral health stigmas, telepsychiatry may help them follow-up with referrals to psychiatry providers who they can see through telehealth as opposed to those they would have to see in-person.

Referral coordinators can help determine if a patient is appropriate for in-home, direct-to-consumer treatment by asking a few simple questions and considering the following:

  1. Can this condition be treated through direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry?
    Anxiety, depression, stress, life transitions, childhood mood disorders, and ADHD are all conditions that can be successfully treated using telepsychiatry. Much like outpatient care, direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry is not appropriate for patients who currently may be suicidal, homicidal, delusional or paranoid.
  2. Does the patient have the technology needed to access telepsychiatry?
    When considering patients for telepsychiatry, referral coordinators should make sure the patient has access to a computer, tablet or smartphone with video calling abilities. Most people already have one or more of these devices and can access telepsychiatry sessions from home. As long as the patient has an email address and is moderately comfortable using technology—telepsychiatry can be an option.
  3. Does the patient have a safe space for accessing direct-to-consumer appointments?
    The patient should have consistent access to a safe and private space in their home, office or another location, such as a community center to have their telehealth sessions.

For many remote referral groups, patients have the option to choose from a list of applicable psychiatry providers based on specialty and area of expertise, and schedule an online appointment at their convenience.

Expanding your referral community

Because telepsychiatry is a newer type of referral option, a practice may want to test direct-to-consumer care on a small group of early adopters to create an easy system for referring before offering this option practice-wide. When evaluating remote referral group options, primary-care doctors should consider:

  • Whether the group is a technology company or if real people are behind the service and involved in supporting the process.
  • If there are opportunities to meet the potential providers referred beforehand, either in person or via video.
  • Whether the group accepts only certain insurance or if all patients are eligible.
  • If the telepsychiatry provider will share information periodically with the primary-care doctor, so all parts of the care team can stay involved and informed (with the patient’s consent).

After a few early adopters, a practice can gauge their comfort level with this type of referral option, generate buy-in from staff and patients and roll out the direct-to-consumer referral option practice-wide.

The impact of telepsychiatry

With direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry as a referral option, primary-care doctors don’t have to settle for the limited choices within their community or provide mental or behavioral health services themselves. Using telepsychiatry, doctors can ensure the mental health of their patients is addressed in an effective and timely fashion, which can ultimately have a direct impact on their health, wellbeing and overall quality of life.

James R. Varrell, M.D. is a child and adolescent psychiatrist who has been practicing telepsychiatry for 18 years and is the Medical Director of InSight Telepsychiatry. InSight’s direct-to-consumer division that currently accepts patient referrals for psychiatry and therapy is called Inpathy.

Read the full article on Physician’s Practice here.

InSight Telepsychiatry Expert Presents Grand Rounds at Deborah Heart and Lung Center

BROWNS MILLS, NJ – Dr. Jim Varrell, InSight’s Medical Director spoke at the Deborah Heart and Lung Center in Brown Mills, NJ during grand rounds. Dr. Varrell gave a presentation on applications of telepsychiatry in hospital settings to an audience of doctors, residents and other behavioral health professionals.

Deborah Heart and Lung Center is a specialty hospital that sees heart and lung patients and has no emergency department. Deborah Heart and Lung Center is also a partner of InSight, where they utilize telepsychiatry on their medical floors.

Dr. Varrell’s presentation gave an in-depth outline of telepsychiatry, which included topics such as:

  • Overview of telepsychiatry
  • Telepsychiatry use in hospitals
  • How to set up a telepsychiatry program
  • Technological setup
  • Clinical workflow
  • Telepsychiatry regulations
  • Clinical best practices and case studies

“Our work at InSight has given us access to all the ins and outs of delivering behavioral healthcare via telemedicine,” said Dr. Varrell. “It is an honor to impart the knowledge we’ve gained from years of experience in the field, to a new generation of healthcare professionals.”

Dr. Varrell and other InSight leadership often present during grand rounds to educate medical professionals on the importance and best practices of telemedicine and its ability to increase access to quality care.

About InSight Telepsychiatry

InSight is the leading national telepsychiatry service provider organization with a mission to increase access to quality behavioral health care through telehealth. InSight’s behavioral health providers bring care into any setting on an on-demand or scheduled basis. InSight has 18+ years of telepsychiatry experience and is an industry thought-leader. Forty percent of InSight’s telepsychiatry providers are child and adolescent psychiatrists. More information can be found at www.InSightTelepsychiatry.com.

About Deborah Heart and Lung Center

The Deborah Vision means continuing to be the premier provider of cardiovascular and pulmonary services in the region. We will be known for excellent clinical outcomes and for supreme customer-driven service, and as the ultimate leader in patient safety and privacy. We will continue to partner with other quality providers and payers to ensure a seamless continuum of care to the patients we serve. We will continue to improve both service and quality in the most cost effective manners. This is our uncompromising standard of care.

InSight Brings Telepsychiatry Services to the Yellowstone County Detention Facility

BILLINGS, MT – Located in south central Montana, Yellowstone County is Montana’s most populous with an estimated 144,797 residents in 2009, according to the Montana Department of Commerce. The Yellowstone County Detention Facility brings six hours a week of InSight telepsychiatry services to their inmates from Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner, Renée Brunner Houser.

Renée Brunner Houser, PMHNP, MSN is a Montana licensed psychiatric nurse practitioner who has worked as a psychiatric nurse practitioner and registered nurse in a variety of settings such as psychiatric hospitals, inpatient/outpatient health centers, hospice facilities and public schools. InSight will provide first time evaluations, follow up care, medication management and more.

According the National Alliance on Mental Illness, at least 83% of jail inmates with a mental illness did not have access to needed treatment. In addition, telepsychiatry is found to improve access to mental health services for inmates and save correctional facilities from $12,000 to more than $1 million [1]. InSight brings years of experience in correctional facility psychiatric care to serve Yellowstone’s inmates and increase access to care when they need it the most.


[1] Deslich, S. (2013). Telepsychiatry in Correctional Facilities: Using Technology to Improve Access and Decrease Costs of Mental Health Care in Underserved Populations. The Permanente Journal,17(3), 80-86. doi:10.7812/tpp/12-123

InSight Executive Director Speaks at Telemental Health Briefing on the Hill

WASHINGTON—On Tuesday, March 28, InSight Telepsychiatry’s Executive Director, Geoffrey Boyce, appeared as a guest speaker at the American Telemedicine Association’s (ATA) briefing, ‘Telehealth for Improving Mental and Behavioral Care.’

Boyce TCC

The briefing was part of ATA’s Telehealth Capitol Connection series—a bimonthly Congressional briefing for policy makers, federal agencies, national organizations and other interested stakeholders.

Boyce spoke after telemental health advocate, Rep. Tim Murphy (R-PA), about four telemental health topics—licensing, credentialing, psychiatric commitment law and prescribing—and how policies around those topics shape how InSight and other telemental health providers can deliver services.

“Telehealth is absolutely a keystone in mental health care because it allows a way to mend the shortage of providers, and provide easier and timely access for inpatient admissions and emergency care,” said Murphy. “It also just makes sense in cost savings.”

Telemental health services are growing rapidly. The VA health system estimates that they conducted 427,000 telemental health sessions in 2016 while InSight Telepsychiatry estimates conducting 150,000 telepsychiatry encounters last year.

Telehealth is addressing critical issues in the behavioral health field, such as shortages in mental health professionals, the challenge of remote care delivery, and, national struggles with suicide, PTSD, opioid addiction and other serious behavioral health issues. Some of the common settings for telemental health services are in hospital emergency departments, outpatient clinics, correctional facilities and direct-to-consumer.

“One of the things we as a practice get most excited about is the potential for telehealth to weave all of these different types of health services and sites together to really help provide care across the continuum, and have more consistency and continuity in that care,” said Boyce.

InSight is a telebehavioral health practice that began telepsychiatry encounters in emergency departments in 1999. Since then, the practice has grown to 250 providers who provide services in 27 different states in a variety of settings. Boyce leads InSight in their mission to increase access to behavioral health care by overseeing the operation of hundreds of U.S. locations every year.

Boyce was joined by fellow speakers: Rep. Tim Murphy (R-PA), John Peters, Telehealth Deputy Director at the Department of Veteran Affairs, Deborah C. Baker, J.D., Director of Legal & Regulatory Policy in the Office of Legal & Regulatory Affairs at the American Psychological Association’s Practice Directorate, and Lauren McGrath, VP of Public Policy at Centerstone.

The briefing was held at Top of the Hill Banquet & Conference Center in Washington, D.C. at 12:00 p.m.

Telepsychiatry: Reaching More Patients For Better Outcomes

By Dr. Jim Varrell, Medical Director, InSight Telepsychiatry

(Originally Published 3/17/17 on Health IT Outcomes)

A 42-year-old woman with chronic anxiety and agoraphobia found herself unable to leave her apartment. She reached out to her primary care doctor who prescribed Xanax, but the medication was only making her feel worse. Unable to go out in public, she found a telepsychiatry provider who adjusted her medication and dosage, connected her with cognitive behavioral therapy, and helped her reclaim her life.

Health IT Outcomes Every year, about 42.5 million Americans struggle with mental illness — enduring stress, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, grief, mood disorders or other psychological concerns. Despite the availability of treatment most people don’t get the help they need, not necessarily due to stigma or denial, but because they can’t: it’s inconvenient or mental healthcare providers aren’t available in their area or within the time frame they need an appointment. To increase access to behavioral healthcare, people need an alternative to traditional doctor referrals, and telepsychiatry can help. Telepsychiatry is a type of telemedicine that uses videoconferencing to provide psychiatric evaluation, consultation, and treatment.

A Growing Market
A key driver of telepsychiatry is the serious shortage of psychiatry providers and other mental health professionals in the U.S. Today there are more than 4,600 mental health professional shortage areas making it difficult, if not impossible, for patients to access services. People referred to psychiatry providers by their primary care doctors face long and potentially dangerous wait times — often three to seven months or longer.

The situation is even worse for those in need of specialty providers, such as child and adolescent psychiatry providers. Currently, there are only about 8,200 practicing child and adolescent psychiatry providers nationally. To put this in perspective, New Jersey alone would need three times as many practitioners as it now has to adequately support the number of children in the state.

Telepsychiatry also offers the promise of delivering more effective mental healthcare in primary care practices. The burden of mental healthcare often falls on primary care doctors, yet many are unable to provide the most appropriate behavioral health resources. Adequately assessing and treating behavioral health issues requires more time with the patient than many doctors or nurse practitioners are able to spend. Moreover, while it is perfectly acceptable for primary care doctors to not know the ins and outs of mental healthcare, many don’t feel equipped to treat behavioral health conditions themselves because they lack specialized training. But without referral options, primary care doctors are often forced to do so. Many practices are overwhelmed with changes in how care is delivered and reimbursed, and under pressure to maximize time with patients, making it difficult for doctors to do it all.

Meeting Behavioral Healthcare Needs

Quality: Telepsychiatry is leading the way in telemedicine for delivering high quality care that meets the standard of traditional in-person care. The American Psychiatric Association supports the use of telepsychiatry as long as it is used in the best interest of the patient and complies with medical ethics and federal privacy and security regulations. It supports the patient-doctor relationship required by law to prescribe medications with documentation — a process identical to the traditional outpatient setting. For these reasons as well, it is increasingly reimbursable by insurance plans.

Continuity of care: In addition to meeting care standards, telepsychiatry positively impacts continuity of care by providing greater accessibility to psychiatry providers. It meets patients where they are. Many patient populations including children, college students, and veterans respond well to this form of treatment, especially since they can maintain the relationship with their same psychiatric provider regardless of location. Other studies have found telepsychiatry can positively impact care for seniors and nursing home residents, reducing costs for the facility as well as improving access to needed care. Age has not been found to be a barrier to acceptance and most seniors readily accept the format.

Access to care: Telepsychiatry is one of the most effective ways to increase access to care for individuals who might otherwise go without. Providing access to specialists for people in rural and remote areas is a challenge. Telepsychiatry offers a practical and cost-efficient way for psychiatry providers to reach these patients. The logistical benefits extend to those in urban centers as well. In light of the dramatic provider shortage, resources are scarce in all settings driving up wait times and commutes to be seen in-person. Telepsychiatry allows existing behavioral health providers to see more people at more flexible times. Many providers who offer telepsychiatry services do so during off-hours to meet the needs of consumers who have trouble finding time for commutes and waiting rooms, or who have trouble leaving their homes.

Cost-effective: Behavioral health issues cost $135 billion every year — almost as much as heart disease and cancer treatment combined. Telepsychiatry can help lower costs for both psychiatry providers and their patients. Studies have found telepsychiatry incurs fewer direct and indirect costs than in-person services saving on provider time, medical supplies, technology, and reimbursement, as well as costs associated with the clinical space, administrative support, travel, and time off work. Nowhere is this savings more pronounced than in the rural setting where telepsychiatry has been found to reduce costs by as much as 40 percent. For hospitals and inpatient residential programs required to provide patients with follow-up care options, telepsychiatry can help ensure a seamless care transition with proactive post-discharge outreach, reducing potential penalties for providers under value-based care.

A Solution For Better Outcomes
Telepsychiatry meets patients’ needs for convenient, flexible, and accessible mental health services, helping improve patient outcomes. The convenience of online appointments makes patients more likely to attend their behavioral health sessions than if they were seeing a provider in person — and when people are consistent in managing their behavioral health, their physical health also improves. It also gives patients more options to find the right provider for them and the care that meets their specific needs, and allows typically underserved groups to access care. This combined with less travel time, less time off work and shorter wait times for services means people get the care they need sooner, are more engaged in their health and happier with their experience of care.

About The Author
James R. Varrell, M.D. has been practicing telepsychiatry for 18 years and is the Medical Director of InSight Telepsychiatry.

InSight Telepsychiatry Supports Creativity and Innovation During Psychiatry Innovation Lab Event

Oct. 19, 2016 | InSight Telepsychiatry was proud to support three awards during the Psychiatry Innovation Lab at IPS: The Mental Health Services Conference organized by the American Psychiatric Association.

Washington, D.C. — InSight Telepsychiatry awarded three finalists for innovative ideas in the advancement of behavioral health care during the Psychiatry Innovation Lab at IPS: The Mental Health Services Conference organized by the American Psychiatric Association.

Chaired by psychiatrist and author Dr. Nina Vasan, the Psychiatry Innovation Lab is an educational workshop that fosters the advancement of health care delivery. The lab offers the opportunity for professionals in technology, business, medicine, government and nonprofits to connect and collaborate with psychiatrists and mental health professionals.

On Oct. 8, participants pitched ideas for the advancement of behavioral health care delivery by way of entrepreneurship, policy, systems redesign, education, collaboration, technology and more. InSight awarded a total of three of the six awards presented at the event.

A team of neuropsychiatry-minded high school students was awarded Outstanding Progress for their work on AlzHelp, an augmented-reality and intelligent personal assistant app that keeps individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease safe. The app was designed by Akanksha Jain, Michelle Koh and Priscilla Siow.

Presented by mental health care entrepreneur April Koh, Spring.com was awarded the Most Promising Innovation for enabling the prediction of treatment outcomes for depression by way of machine-learning and big data.

The last award supported by InSight went to a group called Beacon led by Shrenik Jain for the Most Disruptive Innovation. Beacon is a mobile application for chat-based group therapy that has participated in a diverse selection of health care technology initiatives. A consistent group of anonymous users come together in judgement-free communities with this group therapy app.

Other winners included: The grand prize winner Joseph Insler for his “overdose recovery bracelet” and the audience choice Swathi Krishna for SPECTRUM, an app for children with autism spectrum disorder.

As the leading national telepsychiatry organization, InSight is proud to support a workshop that cultivates the advancement of behavioral health care through innovative applications of technology. InSight provides psychiatric care through innovative applications of technology by providing telepsychiatry services to hospitals, outpatient clinics and other health care organizations nationwide.

Online Behavioral Health for Mental Wellness

October 5, 2016 | Business Innovations Manager of InSight Telepsychiatry Scott Baker discusses how telebehavioral health services like Inpathy can increase access to mental and behavioral health care.

Buffalo, N.Y. – As part of Mental Health Awareness Week, InSight Telepsychiatry’s own Scott Baker was interviewed by WIVB-TV News 4 in Buffalo, NY and asked to discuss how telebehavioral health services like Inpathy can increase access to mental and behavioral health care.

Baker spoke about the convenience of online behavioral health care through Inpathy, the virtual office to over 300 behavioral health providers. Another InSight team member, Melissa Harward, provided a demonstration of the Inpathy videoconferencing platform.

WIVB-TV News 4 reporter, Angela Christoforos highlighted how being able to access care online offers many benefits to individuals and families seeking behavioral health care, including appointment availability at night or on weekends, clinical effectiveness and the convenience of using everyday technology for secure sessions with providers. This is especially helpful for individuals who have issues with scheduling, mobility, transportation and/or  local provider availability.

Inpathy providers are licensed psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, psychologists and therapists who offer a wide variety of behavioral health services like medication management and therapy. View Inpathy providers by searching the directory here: https://portal.inpathy.com/directory-search/start

Watch and read about the interview here.

North Point Behavioral Health Introduces Telepsychiatry Program To Enhance Mental Health Care In St. Clairsville and Bethesda, Ohio

June 26, 2012 | Bethesda, Ohio – North Point Behavioral Health has always been committed to providing comprehensive mental health care that improves quality of life and reduces the effects of mental illness, addiction and trauma on community members.

At the beginning of the July, North Point will launch a new telepsychiatry program that will further enhance their behavioral health services.