Tag Archives: James Varrell

Telepsychiatry: Advancing Connected Community Models

By Dr. James Varrell

The concept of “connected community” holds great potential for elevating and improving behavioral health outcomes for all patients. Connected communities proactively address a patient’s whole health—both physical and mental—and benefit from a comprehensive, multi-faceted behavioral health strategy.

Health care leaders recognize the potential of these models to positively impact clinical outcomes and reduce the need for higher-cost interventions by improving access to care at various points along the continuum. Yet, today’s communities often struggle to achieve this framework amid a severe shortage of psychiatric providers.

The reality is 96 percent of U.S. counties have unmet needs for mental and behavioral health services at a time when demand is soaring.1 Current shortages leave those needing care with less-than-optimal choices. People often turn to primary care doctors, or alternatively, opt for no treatment at all—leading to further deterioration or crisis situations that result in costly interventions.

The good news is that direct-to-consumer (D2C) telepsychiatry can help fill these gaps and improve the outlook on connected community models. While D2C is a relatively new concept, other settings across the care continuum have leveraged telepsychiatry for the past two decades, including hospitals, inpatient units, community-based case centers and correctional facilities.

Leveraged through easy-to-use videoconferencing technology, D2C offerings are opening new doors to psychiatric providers for evaluation, consultation and treatment.

D2C Telepsychiatry: Expanding Access And Referral Options

Growth of D2C telepsychiatry in recent years has expanded as patients become more empowered and seek out convenient ways of managing their care. Patients increasingly prefer “anywhere, anytime” options like the D2C model because it enables access to care from the comfort of home—or other private locations—on their own schedule.

This type of care allows providers to be more proactive and address issues before conditions reach what Mental Health America (MHA) refers to as a “stage four” level of severity. In effect, better patient engagement can trigger greater follow-through with care plans and minimize the potential for symptoms and issues to escalate.

Telepsychiatry often gives providers greater insights into their patients’ environments. For instance, a colleague of mine is a therapist in New Jersey, and she’s been treating one of her patients for years in person. When my colleague started using D2C Telepsychiatry, she was able to see her patient online through real-time video calls rather than in person, and noticed right away that her patient was hoarding her belongings. My colleague was able to learn about her patient’s living condition and other factors that influenced her treatment plans. Further, her patient reported feeling more comfortable and at-ease during their appointments.

D2C telepsychiatry also provides more referral options, enabling earlier interventions and greater access to services. While frequently sought out as a mental health alternative, many primary care providers are uncomfortable prescribing psychotropic medications or lack psychiatry expertise.

By providing a reliable behavioral health referral option, D2C telepsychiatry takes the pressure off of primary care providers. Moreover, collaboration and information exchange between the referring physician and D2C provider can allow for more comprehensive care.

Outside of primary care, D2C expands referral options for discharge planning from acute and inpatient settings. The current mental health provider shortage can slow down referral processes, leading to disjointed transitions where patients must “settle” on whatever is available in the nearby area instead of what is best.

Closing The Loop To A Connected Community

Even as health care leaders increasingly embrace telepsychiatry models, most are currently used in siloes across community settings. However, there’s opportunity to leverage existing resources and establish community-wide telepsychiatry networks to connect all appropriate care settings.

This connected community model improves both information sharing between providers and continuity of care for patients. Patients can use telepsychiatry to see the same provider or same network of providers across different care settings or from home with D2C care. In tandem, primary care doctors, community organizations and telepsychiatry providers can better collaborate on patient care.

Telepsychiatry networks not only improve care outcomes, but also create economies of scale. For instance, health care settings can benefit from sharing a telepsychiatry provider network. This option places less pressure on community resources to recruit and retain local behavioral health providers.

Communities can take steps to utilize a telepsychiatry network across care continuums by:

  • Bringing together payers, primary care, hospital systems, outpatient behavioral health, corrections, schools, skilled nursing and other community organizations
  • Assessing their current behavioral health resources to identify gaps and opportunities
  • Setting multiple locations up with technology to access telepsychiatry
  • Establishing a telebehavioral health network of licensed providers who are aware of community services and resources
  • Utilizing shared scheduling tools for booking psychiatric resources and appointments

Telepsychiatry helps address the gaps in behavioral health care across the continuum by proactively treating patients’ whole health through the concept of the connected community. By increasing patient access to care and referral options, this evolving model supports timely, proactive intervention, minimizing the potential need for more costly care and enabling better outcomes.

About The Author

James R. Varrell, M.D. is a child and adolescent psychiatrist who has been practicing telepsychiatry for 18 years and is the Medical Director of InSight Telepsychiatry. InSight’s direct-to-consumer division that accepts patient referrals for psychiatry and therapy is called Inpathy.

Original article published on Health IT Outcomes

InSight Telepsychiatry Expert Presents Grand Rounds at Deborah Heart and Lung Center

BROWNS MILLS, NJ – Dr. Jim Varrell, InSight’s Medical Director spoke at the Deborah Heart and Lung Center in Brown Mills, NJ during grand rounds. Dr. Varrell gave a presentation on applications of telepsychiatry in hospital settings to an audience of doctors, residents and other behavioral health professionals.

Deborah Heart and Lung Center is a specialty hospital that sees heart and lung patients and has no emergency department. Deborah Heart and Lung Center is also a partner of InSight, where they utilize telepsychiatry on their medical floors.

Dr. Varrell’s presentation gave an in-depth outline of telepsychiatry, which included topics such as:

  • Overview of telepsychiatry
  • Telepsychiatry use in hospitals
  • How to set up a telepsychiatry program
  • Technological setup
  • Clinical workflow
  • Telepsychiatry regulations
  • Clinical best practices and case studies

“Our work at InSight has given us access to all the ins and outs of delivering behavioral healthcare via telemedicine,” said Dr. Varrell. “It is an honor to impart the knowledge we’ve gained from years of experience in the field, to a new generation of healthcare professionals.”

Dr. Varrell and other InSight leadership often present during grand rounds to educate medical professionals on the importance and best practices of telemedicine and its ability to increase access to quality care.

About InSight Telepsychiatry

InSight is the leading national telepsychiatry service provider organization with a mission to increase access to quality behavioral health care through telehealth. InSight’s behavioral health providers bring care into any setting on an on-demand or scheduled basis. InSight has 18+ years of telepsychiatry experience and is an industry thought-leader. Forty percent of InSight’s telepsychiatry providers are child and adolescent psychiatrists. More information can be found at www.InSightTelepsychiatry.com.

About Deborah Heart and Lung Center

The Deborah Vision means continuing to be the premier provider of cardiovascular and pulmonary services in the region. We will be known for excellent clinical outcomes and for supreme customer-driven service, and as the ultimate leader in patient safety and privacy. We will continue to partner with other quality providers and payers to ensure a seamless continuum of care to the patients we serve. We will continue to improve both service and quality in the most cost effective manners. This is our uncompromising standard of care.

The Psychiatrist Shortage in Virginia

By James Varrell, MD

HOW TELEPSYCHIATRY CAN HELP

Due to trends in mental health advocacy and growing clinical evidence, people are increasingly recognizing the benefits of psychiatry and behavioral health care. For example, a 2012 study published in Contingencies measured the cost of a single employee’s depression over a two-year period prior to that employee receiving depression treatment and found the cost to the business to be as high as $3,386 per affected employee.

Unfortunately, even with a cultural shift towards addressing mental illness in Lynchburg, employers and families are struggling to get convenient and timely access to care due to a significant shortage of psychiatrists. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, there are over a million Virginians who experience mental illness and about 300,000 of those illnesses are classified as serious. Even with 930 psychiatrists licensed in Virginia, there simply aren’t enough providers to go around. As a psychiatrist, the demands for services can be overwhelming.

Moreover, because most psychiatrists are concentrated in Virginia’s urban pockets (Northern Virginia, the Richmond metropolitan area and Hampton Roads) many individuals outside of these areas endure long commutes to reach the nearest psychiatrist who has available appointment times. Oftentimes, getting care for oneself or a family member can be off-putting and stressful.

How Telepsychiatry Can Help
Telepsychiatry is a growing and clinically effective way to provide psychiatry, mental and behavioral health care to individuals through online video calls. Telepsychiatry can be used to provide psychiatric evaluations, consultations and treatment to individuals in various settings including outpatient offices, correctional facilities, hospitals, emergency departments, crisis centers or even in homes.

Facility-based telepsychiatry has a decent foothold in the healthcare industry. Today one of telepsychiatry’s newer applications, direct-to-consumer (D2C) telepsychiatry, is quickly becoming popular. D2C telepsychiatry allows providers to give psychiatry, mental and behavioral health care to people directly in their homes or any other private space. This takes away the stress of commuting to and from in-person offices. It also means that the time individuals and their families spend getting care is shortened to only the duration of the session, making it easier to fit into a busy schedule.

An Individual’s Experience with D2C Telepsychiatry
For example, one of my patients, whom I will call Anna, suffers from severe anxiety and depression. As a result of her disorder, Anna struggled to leave her home, and her husband, Rick, often had to take time off of work to accompany her to appointments with her psychiatrist whose office was 50 minutes away.

The stress of her appointments made Anna’s symptoms worse, negatively impacted Rick’s work and put additional strain on their family life.

It was in their search for a better care solution that Anna started to receive psychiatric medication management from me and therapy from one of my colleagues all through telepsychiatry. Anna started to access her sessions from home in the evenings after her children had gone to bed. Using telepsychiatry allowed her to receive treatment independently and the reduced stress of receiving care has empowered her and helped her to better cope with her disorder.

The Benefits of D2C Telepsychiatry

Anna’s experience is one that is shared by many Virginians who struggle to find a convenient psychiatry or behavioral health solution for themselves or their loved ones. Here are some of the many ways people can benefit from D2C telepsychiatry:
• Convenience. People can schedule appointments outside of traditional weekday hours and can easily attend sessions using any computer, tablet or smartphone in any private space with a reliable internet connection.

• Increased access to care. Telepsychiatry expands choices for providers and specialists beyond those who are within driving distance. Any provider nationwide who is licensed in the individual’s state can offer services to them. Practicing online means providers can spend more time treating people instead of traveling between offices.

• High-quality care. With more providers to pick from, people can choose the one who best fits their personality, needs and schedule. Reputable D2C telepsychiatry programs will have their providers trained to deliver telehealth appropriately and effectively.

• Privacy. Telepsychiatry is safe and secure. Some individuals prefer seeking care from the privacy of home without the fear of running into a nosy neighbor in the waiting room.

Not only does this type of treatment make it possible for people like Anna to receive care in a comfortable environment, but it also removes stress from their work and personal relationships. Telepsychiatry improves lives and is an excellent tool for increasing access to psychiatry and behavioral health care in Virginia communities.

Original story posted in Lynchburg Business Magazine.

Telepsychiatry: Raising the Bar on Access to Mental Health Care

By Dr. James Varrell, Telepsychiatrist and Medical Director of InSight

As May—Mental Health Awareness Month—rolls around each year, health care stakeholders are reminded to reflect on the notable achievements and strides made in mental health treatment. The industry continues to forge new paths in terms of technological advancement, research, discovery and awareness, leading to a more holistic approach to care delivery and improved health outcomes across U.S. communities.

In terms of improving access to care, one advancement in particular carries significant weight for expanding care options and lowering costs for patients, providers and communities: telepsychiatry. Telepsychiatry is a form of telemedicine that uses videoconferencing to provide psychiatric evaluation, consultation and treatment. A growing segment of telepsychiatry is direct-to-consumer care, which is working to tear down stigma-related barriers to treatment and open doors to expanded referral options and more timely care. In fact, industry stakeholders increasingly recognize direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry as a primary solution for filling mental health care gaps at a time when the need is soaring.

In tandem with the goals of value-based care, today’s patients and providers are no longer willing to settle for limited mental health treatment choices within their community. Similarly, communities should no longer view the long waits traditionally associated with accessing psychiatric care as acceptable, especially when telepsychiatry lays the foundation for more optimal, timely care delivery.

Recognizing the Need for Greater Access

Today’s mental health landscape is characterized by an increased need for services coupled with a dwindling supply of psychiatrists. The reality is that 42.5 million Americans struggle with mental health conditions including stress, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, grief, mood disorders and other psychological concerns. Unfortunately, accessing effective treatment is not easily attainable given the following statistics:

  • More than 55 percent of U.S. counties are currently without any psychiatrists.
  • The mental health landscape is facing shortages in more than 4,600 areas.

In addition, referrals to community-based psychiatrists often have an average 3-6 month wait time—a fact that is especially true for specialty psychiatrists, such as those who have expertise in complex child conditions. To put this need into perspective, the number of child and adolescent psychiatrists in New Jersey would need to triple to adequately support the need in that state alone.

Primary care doctors are often sought out as a resource for filling these service gaps created by growing demand. Yet, many may be uncomfortable prescribing medication for mental health disorders or lack specific expertise on psychotropic medications.

Consider the following scenario:

A 53-year-old female has a history of refractory depression and has tried numerous antidepressant options through her primary care doctor, who is at a loss as to the correct formula for the patient’s needs. The patient’s history reveals that she has had discrete hypomanic episodes, characterized by sudden displays of energy, productivity and noticeably more creativity. These 1-2 week episodes were followed by a decline back to her usual depression. Looking for a second opinion regarding her care, her primary care doctor referred the patient to a telepsychiatrist.

When the telepsychiatrist reviewed her symptoms he made the conclusion that the patient has type two bipolar disorder and needed an appropriate medication regiment.

Fortunately, in this example, the patient suffering from type two bipolar disorder accessed the needed psychiatry expertise in a timely manner by using direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry. After an accurate diagnosis and subsequent follow-up visits with the telepsychiatrist, the patient’s medications were further adjusted, resulting in effective management of the disorder and a satisfied patient.

The Telepsychiatry Advantage

Direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry introduces notable opportunities to improve access to care. Through live, interactive communication with a licensed psychiatrist in a private setting of the patient’s choice, this treatment model diminishes many of the existing challenges to reaching patients in need.

For instance, patients who live in remote areas where mental health services are lacking have access to psychiatry expertise within a few days rather than several weeks or months. Also, stigma becomes less of an issue as patients are able to experience more privacy, and care is more conveniently accessed in the home or a private location.

Appointment scheduling options outside of traditional office hours address the roadblocks of busy lifestyles that are often a deterrent to consistent follow-up and treatment. In tandem, mental health providers can see more patients with this increased flexibility. Direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry can also support greater continuity of care. For instance, some patient populations, like teens and college students, are more willing to continue treatment if a relationship is maintained with the same psychiatric provider during life transitions like moving to a new city for college.

Telepsychiatry is clinically proven to deliver high-quality care that meets the standard of traditional in-person care for diagnostic accuracy, treatment, effectiveness, quality of care and patient satisfaction. Along with the majority of medical associations, the American Psychiatric Association supports the use of telepsychiatry as long as it is used in the best interest of the patient and complies with medical ethics and federal privacy and security regulations. For these reasons, telepsychiatry is increasingly becoming reimbursable by a number of insurance plans.

Forward Looking

Going forward, the industry must embrace the promise of direct-to-consumer telepsychiatry as a critical strategic component to improving access to care. Telepsychiatry is a viable option and an alternative to traditional in-person care for mental health issues that has the potential to better serve communities and improve population health.

Original story published in HIT Leaders & News.

Live & Practice: Small Towns and Cities

(Original story published in PracticeLink Magazine—Spring 2017)

Marlton, New Jersey

Just 30 minutes from Philidelphia, 90 minutes from New York City and 2 hours from Baltimore, Marlton is popular among people who want to be near family in one of these major geographic areas while enjoying a small-town lifestyle. Marlton has strong community spirit, with several annual festivals sponsored by local government and scores of free exercise facilities, family activities and classes such as yoga and karate for residents.

Small towns and rural areas sometimes present a challenge for health care providers. That was the case when a rural southern New Jersey community first contracted with CFG Health Network, which is based in Marlton.

The community asked CFG to cover its psychiatry needs. But a week before the contract was to begin, there was a new requirement: all physicians had to be able to get to the facility within an hour of getting a call.

To continue reading, click here.

PracticeLink article

 

 

Telepsychiatry: Reaching More Patients For Better Outcomes

By Dr. Jim Varrell, Medical Director, InSight Telepsychiatry

(Originally Published 3/17/17 on Health IT Outcomes)

A 42-year-old woman with chronic anxiety and agoraphobia found herself unable to leave her apartment. She reached out to her primary care doctor who prescribed Xanax, but the medication was only making her feel worse. Unable to go out in public, she found a telepsychiatry provider who adjusted her medication and dosage, connected her with cognitive behavioral therapy, and helped her reclaim her life.

Health IT Outcomes Every year, about 42.5 million Americans struggle with mental illness — enduring stress, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, grief, mood disorders or other psychological concerns. Despite the availability of treatment most people don’t get the help they need, not necessarily due to stigma or denial, but because they can’t: it’s inconvenient or mental healthcare providers aren’t available in their area or within the time frame they need an appointment. To increase access to behavioral healthcare, people need an alternative to traditional doctor referrals, and telepsychiatry can help. Telepsychiatry is a type of telemedicine that uses videoconferencing to provide psychiatric evaluation, consultation, and treatment.

A Growing Market
A key driver of telepsychiatry is the serious shortage of psychiatry providers and other mental health professionals in the U.S. Today there are more than 4,600 mental health professional shortage areas making it difficult, if not impossible, for patients to access services. People referred to psychiatry providers by their primary care doctors face long and potentially dangerous wait times — often three to seven months or longer.

The situation is even worse for those in need of specialty providers, such as child and adolescent psychiatry providers. Currently, there are only about 8,200 practicing child and adolescent psychiatry providers nationally. To put this in perspective, New Jersey alone would need three times as many practitioners as it now has to adequately support the number of children in the state.

Telepsychiatry also offers the promise of delivering more effective mental healthcare in primary care practices. The burden of mental healthcare often falls on primary care doctors, yet many are unable to provide the most appropriate behavioral health resources. Adequately assessing and treating behavioral health issues requires more time with the patient than many doctors or nurse practitioners are able to spend. Moreover, while it is perfectly acceptable for primary care doctors to not know the ins and outs of mental healthcare, many don’t feel equipped to treat behavioral health conditions themselves because they lack specialized training. But without referral options, primary care doctors are often forced to do so. Many practices are overwhelmed with changes in how care is delivered and reimbursed, and under pressure to maximize time with patients, making it difficult for doctors to do it all.

Meeting Behavioral Healthcare Needs

Quality: Telepsychiatry is leading the way in telemedicine for delivering high quality care that meets the standard of traditional in-person care. The American Psychiatric Association supports the use of telepsychiatry as long as it is used in the best interest of the patient and complies with medical ethics and federal privacy and security regulations. It supports the patient-doctor relationship required by law to prescribe medications with documentation — a process identical to the traditional outpatient setting. For these reasons as well, it is increasingly reimbursable by insurance plans.

Continuity of care: In addition to meeting care standards, telepsychiatry positively impacts continuity of care by providing greater accessibility to psychiatry providers. It meets patients where they are. Many patient populations including children, college students, and veterans respond well to this form of treatment, especially since they can maintain the relationship with their same psychiatric provider regardless of location. Other studies have found telepsychiatry can positively impact care for seniors and nursing home residents, reducing costs for the facility as well as improving access to needed care. Age has not been found to be a barrier to acceptance and most seniors readily accept the format.

Access to care: Telepsychiatry is one of the most effective ways to increase access to care for individuals who might otherwise go without. Providing access to specialists for people in rural and remote areas is a challenge. Telepsychiatry offers a practical and cost-efficient way for psychiatry providers to reach these patients. The logistical benefits extend to those in urban centers as well. In light of the dramatic provider shortage, resources are scarce in all settings driving up wait times and commutes to be seen in-person. Telepsychiatry allows existing behavioral health providers to see more people at more flexible times. Many providers who offer telepsychiatry services do so during off-hours to meet the needs of consumers who have trouble finding time for commutes and waiting rooms, or who have trouble leaving their homes.

Cost-effective: Behavioral health issues cost $135 billion every year — almost as much as heart disease and cancer treatment combined. Telepsychiatry can help lower costs for both psychiatry providers and their patients. Studies have found telepsychiatry incurs fewer direct and indirect costs than in-person services saving on provider time, medical supplies, technology, and reimbursement, as well as costs associated with the clinical space, administrative support, travel, and time off work. Nowhere is this savings more pronounced than in the rural setting where telepsychiatry has been found to reduce costs by as much as 40 percent. For hospitals and inpatient residential programs required to provide patients with follow-up care options, telepsychiatry can help ensure a seamless care transition with proactive post-discharge outreach, reducing potential penalties for providers under value-based care.

A Solution For Better Outcomes
Telepsychiatry meets patients’ needs for convenient, flexible, and accessible mental health services, helping improve patient outcomes. The convenience of online appointments makes patients more likely to attend their behavioral health sessions than if they were seeing a provider in person — and when people are consistent in managing their behavioral health, their physical health also improves. It also gives patients more options to find the right provider for them and the care that meets their specific needs, and allows typically underserved groups to access care. This combined with less travel time, less time off work and shorter wait times for services means people get the care they need sooner, are more engaged in their health and happier with their experience of care.

About The Author
James R. Varrell, M.D. has been practicing telepsychiatry for 18 years and is the Medical Director of InSight Telepsychiatry.

Inpathy Gets a Makeover – New Website Makes it Easier to Get Online Psychiatry and Therapy Anytime, Anywhere

Online Therapy and Psychiatry

WASHINGTON, DC (PRWEB) FEBRUARY 20, 2017 – Inpathy has launched a new look for its website, http://www.Inpathy.com. Inpathy is dedicated to making it easy for people to get access to psychiatric, behavioral and mental health care through convenient, online video calls. Inpathy is the newest division of InSight Telepsychiatry, the leading national telepsychiatry service provider organization with nearly two decades of experience delivering online behavioral health care safely and securely.

While InSight’s other divisions bring psychiatrists and mental health providers to community-based facilities and organizations through telehealth, Inpathy uniquely brings life-changing behavioral care directly into people’s home or any other private place. While the website makes it easy for people to self-direct themselves, Inpathy also has a team of care navigators for users to call or email if they would like the extra assistance finding and connecting with a provider.

Online Sessions Make Care Convenient

“Inpathy allows me to help people who have mobility issues, anxiety around commuting or those who just don’t have the time to get to their in-person appointments,” says Jeanine Miles, a New Jersey licensed professional counselor.

There are many reasons people prefer online therapy and psychiatry services.

  • It’s convenient: Be seen when and where it works for you without the hassle of taking time off work or sitting in waiting rooms. Inpathy providers often have next-day appointments and are available evenings and weekends.
  • It provides options: Find the right provider who fits your needs and preferences — whether or not they live in your community. Access licensed counselors, therapists and psychiatry providers who are licensed in your state.
  • It’s safe and secure: Unlike Skype or FaceTime, our technology is HIPAA-compliant and protects your personal information.
  • It’s completely private: Your session on Inpathy is strictly confidential. Inpathy sessions are never recorded and you have control over whether you invite family or friends to join your online video call.
  • It’s easy to use: Inpathy works on any computer, tablet or smartphone with internet and a webcam. Plus, we offer 24/7 support for tech issues, test calls and troubleshooting.
  • It’s flexible to schedule: Weekdays a no-go? Need to do a session after the kids go to bed? No problem. Appointments are available 7 days a week from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. — and it often only takes a few days from your request before you can meet with a provider.
  • It’s effective: Numerous studies have also shown that it is highly effective as a form of treatment and sometimes more effective than traditional in-person care.

According to Dr. Varrell, Medical Director of Inpathy and a child and adolescent psychiatrist who has been doing video sessions with people for the past 18 years, “Many people, especially children, are able to talk to me more easily through televideo than in person. Online care is more comfortable, less intimidating and it removes some of the power dynamics so people are more likely to open up more quickly than in-person care.”
Insurance companies and employers are also recognizing the advantages of online care and are starting to include services like Inpathy as a benefit.

Referring to Online Psychiatry and Therapy Saves Time and Money

In addition to convenience for individuals seeking care, Inpathy also acts as a non-traditional resource for health care providers or organizations that would like to use it as a referral option.

In a recent webinar on expanding referral options through online psychiatry, Inpathy’s Practice Liaison, Anne Marie Jones, explains its benefits: “With a network of over 300 behavioral health care providers, Inpathy can help reduce opportunity costs in terms of time, transportation and absenteeism.”

The New Inpathy Website

The Inpathy new website is a resource for people who want to connect with licensed professional therapists, counselors and psychiatry providers. It offers:

  • Online assessments
  • Information on the types of behavioral health care providers and the services they offer
  • Explanations on how to sign up, find a provider and book a session
  • A searchable directory of providers who offer online sessions
  • Access to care navigators who can answer questions and help you sign up
  • 24/7 technical support

“We wanted this new website to be helpful for people seeking care and give them hope that receiving behavioral health care doesn’t have to be a stressful ordeal every time they meet with their provider. It can be as easy as a Skype call and as private as online banking,” says Olivia Boyce, InSight’s Marketing and Communications Manager.

Inpathy services are available is most states. Inpathy has its largest provider and insurance networks in California, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Virginia, and Missouri.

Read the original press release here.

 

Billings Clinic is now Bringing After-hours Psychiatric Care to its Emergency Department and Inpatient Unit Through Partnership with InSight Telepsychiatry

Jan. 17, 2017 | Billings Clinic of Billings, Montana, has partnered with InSight Telepsychiatry to bring after-hours telepsychiatry services to their emergency department and inpatient unit, an innovative program which will ensure individuals in need of psychiatric treatment at Billings Clinic will have access to timely, quality care.

BILLINGS, MT — Billings Clinic, Montana’s largest healthcare organization, and InSight Telepsychiatry are pleased to announce a new partnership to increase inpatient and emergency psychiatric coverage.

The program is designed to lessen wait times for psychiatric evaluations, admission, and treatment decisions.  The partnership gives Billings Clinic staff access to a team of remote psychiatrists who can do psychiatric evaluations, follow-up consultations and medical consultations through telehealth using video calls. Nurses and emergency department physicians can now connect patients with a remote telepsychiatry provider in as little as an hour.

The telepsychiatry program runs from 10 p.m. to 8 a.m., 7 days per week. Since, psychiatric emergencies often happen at night or on weekends, this schedule means that individuals in crisis are able to get the care they need more quickly.

The program is a result of a partnership between Billings Clinic and InSight Telepsychiatry, the leading national telepsychiatry organization and partner of MHA Ventures, a subsidiary of the Montana Hospital Association. Montana, like many other states across the country, struggles to have sufficient psychiatric coverage in its hospitals and clinics due to a national shortage of psychiatrists.

At nearly double the national average, Montana has the highest suicide rate in the United States with more than 23 suicides per 100,000 people[1]. Additionally, over 75% of Montana’s population has inadequate access to psychiatry[2]. So with the option to utilize remote providers, telepsychiatry and other telemedicine services represent unprecedented access to specialists who are typically difficult to recruit in rural and underserved areas.

“Really, the best thing about a program like this one,” says InSight’s Medical Director Jim Varrell, MD, “is that Montanans now have access to psychiatric services where they may not have had previously.”

”This partnership is another step for Billings Clinic toward improving mental health care for people in crisis,” said Lyle Seavy, Billings Clinic Director of Psychiatry, “We are addressing those peak times when staffing is a challenge to help meet the needs of our patients, help reduce strain on our staff and help improve the experience for people in a mental health crisis.”

As a result of the partnership, the telepsychiatry program is expected to expand into additional Billings Clinic facilities.

In addition to facility-based models of telepsychiatry, InSight is also working with the Montana chapter of Mental Health America to offer telemental health care to individuals in their home or other private spaces online.

About Billings Clinic

Billings Clinic is Montana’s largest health system serving Montana, Wyoming and the western Dakotas. A not-for-profit organization led by a physician CEO, Billings Clinic is governed by a board of community members, nurses and physicians. At its core, Billings Clinic is a physician-led, integrated multispecialty group practice with a 285-bed hospital and Level II trauma center. Billings Clinic has more than 4,000 employees, including more than 400 physicians and advanced practitioners offering more than 50 specialties. More information can be found at www.billingsclinic.com.

About InSight Telepsychiatry

InSight is the leading national telepsychiatry service provider organization with a mission to increase access to quality behavioral health care through telehealth. InSight’s behavioral health providers bring care into any setting on an on-demand or scheduled basis. InSight has 18+ years of telepsychiatry experience and is an industry thought-leader. More information can be found at www.InSightTelepsychiatry.com.

 


[1] Suicide: Montana 2016 Facts and Figures. (2016). In American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Retrieved January 12, 2017, from https://afsp.org/about-suicide/state-fact-sheets/#Montana

[2] Mental Health Care Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs). (2016, September 8). In Kaiser Family Foundation. Retrieved January 12, 2017, from http://kff.org/other/state-indicator/mental-health-care-health-professional-shortage-areas-hpsas/?currentTimeframe=0

InSight Telepsychiatry Presents at American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Annual Meeting

October 28, 2016 │ InSight Telepsychiatry was proud to present on the legal, regulatory and financial realities of telepsychiatry at the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry’s 63rd Annual Meeting.

New York, NY – InSight Telepsychiatry’s Executive Director, Geoffrey Boyce, and Medical Director, Dr. Jim Varrell, presented at the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry’s (AACAP) 63rd Annual Meeting held in New York City. The AACAP annual meetings are a gathering place for leaders in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry, children’s mental health and other allied disciplines.

Boyce and Dr. Varrell’s presentation, entitled Legal, Regulatory and Financial Realities of Telepsychiatry, was delivered during the “Road Map to Establish and Sustain a Telepsychiatry Practice” clinical breakout session organized by Dr. Kathleen Myers and attended by over 100 child and adolescent psychiatrists. Their presentation covered topics including models of telepsychiatry, reimbursement, licensure, the provider-patient relationship and emergency protocol. Other presentations during this breakout session included Media Training to Develop and Authentic Patient-Doctor Relationship presented by Dr. David E. Roth and Competencies in Telepsychiatry: Residency Training and Maintenance of Skills presented by Dr. Daniel A. Alicata.

Additionally, Dr. Varrell presented on the entrepreneurial side of telepsychiatry during the breakout’s TED-talk style session. He discussed being a thought leader in telepsychiatry and telepsychiatry best practices. Dr. Varrell has been providing telepsychiatry services since 1999 and is one of the founding members of InSight Telepsychiatry, the national leading telepsychiatry service provider.

Boyce and Dr. Varrell also took part in the breakout session’s ‘Genius Bar.’ They hosted a “Careers in Telepsychiatry: Choose Your Own Adventure” station where attendees were encouraged to ask them questions about what a career in telepsychiatry looks like. Telepsychiatry provides a unique opportunity for psychiatric providers because it allows them to work from home, extending their hours to nights and weekends.

Geoffrey Boyce is the Executive Director of InSight Telepsychiatry and an active participant in telemedicine advocacy, education and reform initiatives.

Jim Varrell, MD is the President and Medical Director of the CFG Health Network and InSight Telepsychiatry who has been at the forefront of telepsychiatry across the nation and continues to educate the medical community regarding the benefits of telepsychiatry.

InSight Telepsychiatry is the national leading telepsychiatry provider organization with a mission to increase access to behavioral health care.

InSight Telepsychiatry Selected as Industry Partner of Washington Hospital Services

February 3, 2016 | Olympia, WA — Washington Hospital Services (WHS) has recently partnered with InSight Telepsychiatry, the leading national telepsychiatry service provider organization. Washington Hospital Services exists to support hospitals and health systems through the delivery of services and products that support organization’s operations. WHS is a subsidiary of the Washington State Hospital Association and aims to help members achieve their missions and improve the health of communities across the state and region.

InSight is the leading national telepsychiatry service provider organization with over 17 years of industry experience and background implementing telepsychiatry programs across the spectrum of care. InSight also recently launched a branch of the organization dedicated to allowing consumers to select and connect with a mental health provider of their choice entirely from home, called Inpathy.

Telepsychiatry has been proven an effective and cost-conscious way to bring psychiatrists, especially those with specialties like child and adolescent, into areas where there may be a shortage. With telepsychiatry, organizations can access psychiatrists even during difficult to staff hours like nights and weekends.

WHS and InSight view telepsychiatry as a potential solution for many of Washington State’s recent struggles with high youth suicide rates and high instances of psychiatric boarding.

InSight went through a significant vetting process before being selected as a WHS Industry Partner. InSight is offering excellent pricing for WHS members and also exploring opportunities to create unique consortiums so that remote hospitals and other clinics can leverage their buying power and increase access to psychiatrists across multiple Washington locations.

“We are excited by this partnership’s ability to bring care to Washington communities that have been struggling with psychiatric boarding and inadequate psychiatric support,” says Dr. Jim Varrell, Medical Director of InSight. “With on-demand telepsychiatry, hospitals can have access to psychiatrists who can make admission or treatment decisions within about an hour on average. Other locations like clinics, primary care offices or even individuals homes, can also benefit from our scheduled telepsychiatry services since so many communities have a shortage of local psychiatrists. With telepsychiatry psychiatrists can offer care to anyone, anywhere as long as there is adequate internet connectivity.”

As part of the partnership, InSight will host several webinars exclusively for WHS members, covering topics like clinical best practices for telepsychiatry, implementing successful telepsychiatry programs and understanding telepsychiatry-related regulatory and policy updates. Telepsychiatry is a hot topic across the country right now and members of the InSight team regularly speak on similar topics at the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the American Telemedicine Association, NAMI and other annual conferences.

InSight and WHS will also share telepsychiatry-related resources including white papers and articles with WHS members.

“InSight offers a unique product that helps solve the complex issue of providing access to psychiatric care in a cost effective manner,” said Tom Evert, President of WHS. “We are pleased to bring Washington Hospitals a potential solution to increase access to psychiatric specialists through this partnership.”

Telepsychiatry Leader Predicts Major Industry Changes

Telepsychiatry, or psychiatric care provided through real-time videoconferencing, is a widely used medium for bringing psychiatric care into locations with limited access to mental health professionals. Telepsychiatry is allowing individuals to access behavioral health services like never before.

In this white paper, telebehavioral health leader James R. Varrell, M.D. details exciting developments he foresees for the telepsychiatry industry.

Download this white paper.